Becoming Our Best

"MOTORCYCLE DOWN





Recently Martha and I were crossing Nevada on U.S. Hwy 50, “The Loneliest Road in America”. It lives up to its reputation with very few towns, very few vehicles using the road, limited cell phone reception and stark, beautiful scenery along the way. A special travel route.

Between Eureka and Austin, NV, we had just driven off the highway on a dirt road to hike around in the Hickison Petroglyphs:
http://www.360cities.net/image/hickison-petroglyphs-nevada-2#-7.39,17.07,110.0 They are a remarkable sight, inscribed on most impressive limestone formations. Well worth a visit.

As we stopped to re-enter Hwy 50, I looked left and saw a fast-moving motorcycle miss a curve, fly off the highway and throw the cyclist in the air like a rag doll, then bounce along in the sagebrush. An awful sight! And we were the only ones near the accident, since the 4 other cyclists ahead of him hadn’t yet noticed that the last motorcycle and its driver were missing. We were able to go to the scene, and also get a NV state construction crew to call on the radio for emergency help. Minutes later an EMT just happened to arrive and then started CPR. Martha stayed and held the victim’s hand while I slowed approaching traffic. An hour and a half later, the cyclist was carried away in an ambulance, apparently hanging between life and death.

How could one prepare to help when confronted with an emergency of this type? Here are some thoughts:

Be aware of your surroundings and possible sources of assistance, like the NV state construction employees who were a mile or so away. Their radio was used to contact emergency services.
Know something about CPR and emergency assistance techniques. They could save a life, be it a family member or stranger.
If you can’t do anything else, hold the person’s hand, direct traffic or do something which could be helpful at the scene.

When we found out later that the victim died, Martha contacted his relatives. They were very grateful that she had been there with their Dad, holding his hand as life ebbed away. We were grateful to be able to help.


Author: Bruce Johnsen Management Consultant:
824 Munras Ave Suite G
Monterey, CA 93940
831-373-5969
bruce@brucejohnsen.com

Back to BOB Main